Inventor Insights: Part III

December 10, 2018

Why you 'lone-wolf' inventors need a pack to profit from your strengths.

 

Inventors often become 'lone wolves' out of necessity. Few people around us understand our incessant desire to tinker, create and improve things.  

 

We soon develop 'lone wolf syndrome', thinking no-one can be trusted with our 'idea-cubs' [growl].

 

Doing it all can be tiring and so, here is a way to find and effectively work with others who share your passion.

 

First, go where like-minded people gather. This means a physical or internet-based group. There are groups on Facebook, and Linked-In and it’s these I’ll focus on.

 

Introduce yourself, and what you are interested in. Read the posts and see where you can contribute. Once you're seen as a giver you can invite people to join a private mastermind group.

 

Work out what skills you want in the group. If you have strengths - then say so. You need others who are better than you at some skill and you will be able to help each other in trade.

 

Be business-like at the start and loosen up as you get to know people. Ask members to sign a non-disclosure agreement stating they will not talk to anyone else about what is discussed in the group.

These up-front rules are helpful.

  • Discuss one or two peoples' ideas per week.

  • All improvements made to an invention belong to the original inventor.

  • If someone comes up with a new idea during the session time it belongs to that person no matter what improvements are made during the session.

The above rules work when unpinned by one key principle.

 

Abundance.

 

Knowing that no-matter how much you give away in a session there is always more you can create frees you up to contribute - and in return be contributed too.

 

If someone asks you to work on a project, they are the project leader. If you cannot persuade them that your improvement is better- let them have their way.

 

Be punctual, and as much as possible - do what you say you will do. 

 

Ultimately, you need to trust people with your idea. But there is real joy in working with like-minded people - it makes the journey less lonely and more rewarding.

 

 

 

 

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